Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Dragon Blood Jasper, Dragon's Blood Jasper Another New Stone?

I want to use a Dragon's Blood Jasper, or, as some might say, a Dragon Blood Jasper, as an example of one of the new stones coming from China, or, other Asian parts. I say "other Asian parts" because I have done a lot of Googling to find out more about this stone and all I can find are lists of Asian manufacturers and distributors. I have found one supplier that states that it is mined in Australia, but I have not found anymore instances of that fact. I can't find info on the treatment, if any.

I call this a new stone, but we know it isn't real new. It has been around in cabochon form as well as bead and pendant bead form for awhile now, but in lapidary terms, it is fairly new. For me, though, it is very new.

I just finished my first cab. I thought I would give you my impression of it. First of all, I'm a sucker for color and pattern, so I really liked this from the start. I also really like the cut, but that has nothing to do with the stone except that I suspect that it is easy to cut. The color is a very intense blue/green. It has a dyed look to it. Against this nicely saturated background are splashes of bright,  brick red- the dragon's blood. It seems very hard and takes a nice polish. It isn't pitted. It felt very hard when I was working it. It didn't make me feel like I needed to treat it carefully- it felt like a rock. :) Versus some stones, like calcite, that feel fragile.

I didn't get this stone from a high end dealer. I'm sure it was native cut. Have you heard that term before? It literally means, cut in the country where it is found. I am going to assume that is somewhere in China, judging by all the Asian distributors. If I find that it is indeed mined in Australia, I'll correct myself.

I'm no expert on rocks, by any means, and I'm not a lapidary. But, I'm pretty experienced. Sometimes, when I have a stone I haven't worked with before, I get the idea that putting it in the tumbler all night will tell me a lot. That's just what I did. I had suspected that this was dyed, but when I pulled it out after about 12 hours, it looked the way it did going in. The polish was still there and so was the color. So, if it is dyed, it is a stable dye. But, I think it isn't. That is my unscientific way of telling dyed from not dyed- or, rather, stable dye from temporary dye. Have you ever thrown dyed beads in a tumbler and have them come out pastel and frosted looking? That's what I call a temporary dye. Don't take my word as the gospel truth. Do your own tests, use your own intuition and tumble wisely. This stone was inexpensive enough that I was willing to risk disaster. You may not be willing to risk yours. 

I'm quite pleased with Dragon Blood Jasper. If it is a jasper, I can't say. Marketing has a way of misnaming stones to get them to sell. But, that's another blog post. I can't tell you if 20 years ago this went by a different name, but it is a very real possibility. Dragon blood seems plentiful and inexpensive, so it may have been around for awhile under a different name.

So, enough of my meandering... here's a couple pictures. I ran out of LOS. The first picture is bare copper, the second is with the boiled egg patina technique.

Green Red Dragon Dragon's Blood Wire Wrapped Wirewrapped Pendant
Clicking this image will open the image in my shop in a new tab.

6 comments:

  1. Oh Tela! I may have said this before, but when I grow up I want to wrap cabs just like you! This one is so elegant, I have no words!

    I am still trying to follow your cab-wrapping tute I bought and not doing so very successfully. I am also gathering the equipment and supplies needed for the fused copper tut but haven't even started that one other than reading it six times, all the way through.

    I will get there, and post my completed projects, but not until they have not been ripped off and thrown into my scrap copper pile (getting big enough for recycle!). But, I am determined to get it done, and done well, asap.

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    1. Susan, I hope you know that you can email if you are having trouble. I hope it's not the tute! Which one are you working on? Some of the designs are pretty tricky. But, I have faith in you and you certainly seem determined! :)You'll get it. Just relax and have fun :)

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  2. A beautiful wrap, and a beautiful stone! I'm glad it survived its time in the tumbler -- sounds like a great way to test a stone to me!

    Mr. Sequin tried the egg method a few years back. He could never get his piece to stop smelling like an egg! Any suggestions for getting the odor out?

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    1. Thanks Sarah :) Tell Mr. Sequin he has my sympathy. I haven't a clue how to get rid of the smell. I've never encountered that before. Very strange... and smelly. :)

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  3. Lovely piece :) From what I understand, Dragon's Blood Jasper comes from South Africa. It is also called Blood Jasper. These are probably just marketing names for Bloodstone, although the pics I have found look darker in color.

    It is a safe bet to assume that most things coming out of China are fake, lab created or synthesized. They do have some legit Turquoise which is kind of what that looks like :)

    It is a lovely piece. Beautiful wrap :)

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  4. Lovely piece :) From what I understand, Dragon's Blood Jasper comes from South Africa. It is also called Blood Jasper. These are probably just marketing names for Bloodstone, although the pics I have found look darker in color.

    It is a safe bet to assume that most things coming out of China are fake, lab created or synthesized. They do have some legit Turquoise which is kind of what that looks like :)

    It is a lovely piece. Beautiful wrap :)

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Thank you for sharing your thoughts and comments.