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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Feeling Philosophical



I did a few stones today. I took pictures, lots of pictures. Instead of having you scroll through them, I made this quickie video for you.

While making the video, I was thinking up names for the stones and it occurred to me that I must be in a very serene mood. I even used the word "gentle" twice. :) Any other time and the titles could be very different. It got me thinking.

I received a few emails lately from people who described rocks as the work of God. We, as a Nation, are becoming more and more secular. Some people may prefer to just say Mother Nature. I usually refer to my rocks as gifts from Mother Nature, myself. But, truth be told, I'm a God fearing woman, though I don't adhere to any ascribed religion. I don't go to a church or temple. However, I do believe there is something greater myself. I give credit to the Creator of all things for the gifts from the Earth.

When I finish a piece, and before I can take credit for it, I acknowledge that I am nothing without the gifts bestowed upon me. I give a silent thanks for allowing me the skills to do what I do. (Not to mention the patience.) I want to be humble, I am humbled. I honestly believe that every wrap starts with a great rock. Not a great cab, but a great rock- A chunk of the earth that was pulled from its dirty home by some devoted rockhound who saw promise in its raw form. But, where did that rock come from?

I could get scientific and maybe sometime I will because it is fascinating. But, it is also so complicated that you have to wonder about how things were set in motion to begin with. During the Age of Enlightenment, the Age of Reason, great thinkers, philosophers and men of science, embraced Him as the Great Clockmaker, rather than turning away towards atheism. When I think of all the momentous events that have to have happened for me to be able to polish and wrap a rock, I can't help but to think of the Clockmaker, the One who set it all in motion.

I am in awe of the perfection in systems of science. Whether it be geology or meteorology, there is a simple beauty in it all. A perfection. What seem to be random events culminate into things we can understand- or eventually understand.

I'm a science nerd and a science fiction geek. I also love rocks. And, in some weird way, I find they are related. I have never thought of science as a substitute for God. I have not met a lot of science nerds who have. For everything that we as a species know, there are many things that are hidden from us- like who put it all in motion? Who created the Big bang? What Was before the Big Bang? These questions can be asked of my rocks, too.

I don't want to devolve here into a discussion of entropy or quantum physics or any number of things that are coming to my meandering mind right now. I just wanted to get a little philosophical about my rocks. Yes, I can be philosophical about rocks. Now, you know how truly weird I am about rocks. It goes pretty deep. They aren't just pretty. They represent, for me, the hand of the Great Clockmaker and interconnectedness of everything. The journey itself from rock to jewelry fascinates me and completes a cycle that was set in motion at the beginning of time.

It's late now and I'm done saying my bit.


8 comments:

  1. Tela, What a beautiful and heartfelt post! Your video was a great way to depict your cabs. The names you have chosen are poetic and capture the essence of the cab.

    It amazes me how someone can spot the hidden beauty within a rock. Another, takes the rock and finds just the right area to bring a cab to life. Thank you for your thoughts and words. You have an incredible spirit!

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    1. Hi Christine, it really is amazing that some lowly, dirty, ugly rock becomes such a thing of beauty.

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  2. So true. A chemistry professor laid it out in the same fashion over a beer (ok, several) after class. I was surprised that a "man of science" could possess such a deep and abiding faith. He said that, given his knowledge of the order and structure of things "how could I not?"

    Working with stone, like woodturning and some of the other visual arts, gives us the privilege of experiencing God's face revealed when we open up a seemingly nondescript chunk of material and see the incredible beauty contained within. We seek it out because we know it is there, and we reveal it to the world through the work of our own hands. What a privilege!

    Humbling, indeed.

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    1. Well put! Very well put! Humbling, yes, and a privilege, as you say.

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  3. Beautifully written words by everyone today. I do love playing with Gods color pallet.
    Your cabs are beautiful as they always are.
    Have a blessed day,

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    1. Thank you, Gina. :) I think one really needs to stop and smell the roses or stop and really look at the rocks. LOL! I like that- God's color pallet, how true and what an amazing range!

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  4. Well said! You touched on a lot of points that have been on my mind recently, too. I think it's impossible to use our "brains" that were created by some other force to understand that force. It's too big and my brain's too small - even for all the technology we've produced. :) Thanks for all you do!

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    1. Hi and welcome to the blog! Thanks so much for commenting. I don't often get philosophical enough to want to share, but you know, every once in awhile I just have to ponder the deeper realities of life. Glad to know I'm not alone in my wonderment. :)

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Thank you for sharing your thoughts and comments.